E-scooter laws explained as police remind Reading riders of rules Leave a comment


READING’S town centre police officers have been out and about reminding e-scooter users of the law.

An update posted by the Thames Valley Police Reading Facebook page updated residents of what the team had been up to.

Posted on Wednesday, May 5, it read: “The town centre team were on cycle and foot patrol in the town centre and down Oxford Road. Numerous stop checks made, drug searches completed, area searching for a suspect, one male sighted and later arrested.”

Thames Valley Police officers were reminding residents of the law around e-scooters. Images via TVP and WIkimedia Commons

Thames Valley Police officers were reminding residents of the law around e-scooters. Images via TVP and WIkimedia Commons

It added: “Several persons riding E-Scooters informed of the law and lots of the public happy to see us.”

But what is the law on e-scooters?

Can you ride an e-scooter on the road?

E-scooters can only be used on private land with permission from the landowner.

READ MORE: Resident urges police to sort out poor parking in Reading

The vehicles qualify as ‘powered transporters’ and are therefore required to have MOT, tax, licensing and insurance.

As e-scooters can’t currently meet these requirements, riding a privately-owned e-scooter on a public road, or another public place, is a road traffic offence.

File photo dated 27/7/2019 of a man using an electric scooter. Electric scooters are being used in hundreds of offences including assaults, burglaries and anti-social behaviour, according to police data. Other cases involve riders drunk and high on drugs

File photo dated 27/7/2019 of a man using an electric scooter. Electric scooters are being used in hundreds of offences including assaults, burglaries and anti-social behaviour, according to police data. Other cases involve riders drunk and high on drugs

What happens if you ride your e-scooter in a public place?

Anyone caught doing this is committing a criminal offence and can be prosecuted.

READ MORE: Driver who delivered gun to drug-dealer before shooting ambush gets jail time

Charges can include driving without a valid licence and driving without a licence.

If found guilty, the penalty can be a fine of £300 and up to six points on your driving licence if you have one.

Your e-scooter could also be seized.

Mercedes driver Valtteri Bottas of Finland rides a scooter in the paddock ahead of the Portugal Formula One Grand Prix at the Algarve International Circuit near Portimao, Portugal, Thursday, April 29, 2021. The Portugal Grand Prix will be held on Sunday.

Mercedes driver Valtteri Bottas of Finland rides a scooter in the paddock ahead of the Portugal Formula One Grand Prix at the Algarve International Circuit near Portimao, Portugal, Thursday, April 29, 2021. The Portugal Grand Prix will be held on Sunday.

What about e-scooters you can hire legally?

In areas where government trials allow you to hire e-scooters for legal use, such as in Milton Keynes, riders must lease the scooters from companies with relevant motor insurance.

READ MORE: Attempted robbery outside petrol station lead to police appeal

You must also be over 16, hold a full provisional driving licence, drive them on public roads and cycle lanes but not on pavements.

Only one person can use them at any one time.

We’ve set up a new Facebook group where you can find all the most interesting court and crime stories from around Berkshire.

Click the link above to join.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SHOPPING CART

close