Greyp Bikes Is Not A Bike Company, It’s A Tech Company That Makes Great E-Bikes Leave a comment


“When you talk about Greyp, the first thing you need to understand is that we’re not a bike company,” explained Allyson Vought (the only blonde in the above picture, center-right), during a phone call last week. “We’re a tech company. We’re a tech company that just happens to make some of the best bikes in the world.” And, regardless of how you feel about her first claim, there is no denying the latter.

For the unfamiliar, Greyp builds almost impossibly high-tech electric bicycles that merge cutting edge connectivity software, high-tech carbon fiber construction, and a veritable “who’s who” of top-shelf components into a design that’s very Michael Bay Transformers. The bikes don’t just look like action movie props, either — a bike like the Greyp G6.3 Rebel FS will even help you shoot your movie, shipping as it does, with a pair of wide-angle HD cameras fitted front and rear to capture whatever bonkers adventures you have on the ultra-capable machine. You can make sure those cameras are always on, too, so you’ll never make the jump and miss out on the bragging rights.

Despite all the bike’s high-tech capabilities — and, mind, we haven’t even begun to scratch the surface here — it’s nowhere near the high-end of hardcore cycling’s high-end market. And, weirdly, that seems to make the business of actually selling Greyp bikes more difficult than you might think. “There’s so much going on with these bikes that it’s hard to get the dealers to do the whole ‘dog and pony show’ for potential customers,” says Vought, who didn’t mention any specifics about her environment, but gave off a very Katherine Hepburn smoking in a lounge chair sort of vibe, regardless. “When you do get the whole picture, and really understand what goes into these bikes, the price actually seems low.”

She’s right about that. Consider that you can walk into one of Greyp’s 24 US dealers (as of this writing), swipe about $5900 onto your credit card of choice, and ride out on one of these bicycles built by a tech company and out into the world, complete with a 4-year TMobile contract that keeps your bike connected to all the other Greyp bikes out there, and Greyp corporate, as well. That’s at about half the cost of a Pivot Shuttle eMTB, and just a third of the MSRP of a Colnago Ottanta or Cervelo Lamborghini road bike … and those you have to pedal entirely on your own, without electronic assistance or an internet-enabled video feed. You know, like an animal.

That electronic assistance is part of what sets the Greyp apart from other high-end bikes, too. It’s not so much the motor — which, despite being a high-quality unit manufactured by MPF Drive, is not unique to Greyp. Instead, it’s the parts that are unique to Greyp — namely a suite of controls and software that were developed to get the absolute most out of the bike’s battery. A battery that just so happens to have been developed by the electrification experts at Rimac.

Yes, that’s the same Rimac that builds the 1924 HP C_Two hypercar, developed the basis for the 1900 HP Pininfarina Battista supercar, and who — through massive investment and collaboration — can take a whole lot of credit for the consistent, jaw-dropping performance of the “Born to Fly” Porsche Taycan and Audi e-Tron EVs.  It’s a huge deal, in other words, and it may be miles ahead of other e-bikes’ power solutions.

That was a sentiment echoed by our own Nicolas Zart, when the lucky duck got a chance to ride the Greyp G6 on a bucket list trip to Croatia back in 2019. “The 55.6 km Blaca trail brought us over the island to isolated beaches, spectacular panoramic views, quiet nooks, and flat-out off-road mountain bike paths along the way,” he wrote. And, remember, he is no stranger to mountain biking in the Mediterranean, so he speaks with some authority when he writes that, “the [Greyp] handled all the terrain thrown at it with a cheerful disposition. The chassis felt poised and eager to take on anything without any obvious flex … this is a wonderful beast.”

You can read more about Nicolas’ trip by clicking this link to the original article, which includes some great photography and video of the ride and the region. It’s worth a look.

On the Blaca Trail with the G6 — Nicolas Zart.

Back to Allyson though — she seems bullish on Greyp’s prospects as she talks about the company’s new US headquarters in Whitney, TX, about an hour outside of Dallas/Ft. Worth. “We sold about 150 bikes last year,” she says. “Of course, that’s as many as we could get. On a good day the factory makes a handful of these bikes. Maybe 4 or 5.” Once the new showroom is done and new dealers are brought on board in new markets, most notably the red-hot Chicago and South Florida markets, that number is expected to double.

I have every impression that they’ll hit that goal, too. Before I sign off with my usual “check out this video and let us know what you think” closing paragraph, though, there was one last thing I wanted to share, because it gives you a sense of how the rest of the conversation went and the kind of vibe that Greyp is putting out there. I asked Allyson, as I ask everyone I interview for an article, what they wanted me to say about them. Like, assuming they could put one thing, unedited, into my article, what would it be– you know? Almost inevitably, I get some kind of canned corporate answer or well-rehearsed mission statement. When I asked Allyson that question, this is what I got: “That’s a bit of a loaded question, isn’t it? I’d say, ‘Smart, sexy, and fun to ride’.”

Check out the videos below, then let us know what you think of Greyp USA’s chances to keep doubling and re-doubling its growth in the booming e-bike market in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Original content from CleanTechnica


 



 


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