Taranaki petrol head builds his own electric bike from scratch Leave a comment


Mitch Pearce owns two Harley Davidsons and seven other motorbikes but his most recent machine is a little different – it’s a home-built e-bike.

The New Plymouth man has created a bike without pedals that charges at the wall, something he’s never seen before.

“It’s not really a motorbike, but it’s not really a push-bike,” he said. “I’d say it’s a motorbike if a cop were to pull me up.”

It took Pearce about a year-and-a-half to build the bike, but he’s  happy with the result.

SIMON O’CONNOR/Stuff

It took Pearce about a year-and-a-half to build the bike, but he’s happy with the result.

Pearce, a welding and fabrication tutor at the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki (Witt), said he’s done plenty of work on petrol-powered bikes in the last decade, but nothing like this.

READ MORE:
* Electricarna back again for 2021
* Blip scooters are back on the streets – complete with hand sanitiser
* Compact cities, low-methane sheep and EVs: Life in our zero-carbon future

“Things with motors are usually my preference,” he said.

It all started when he was given an electric bike motor, that can be fitted on a bicycle, from a family friend.

It inspired him to try something different.

“I thought, how do I get something low and long that looks cool.”

Mitch built everything for the bike, except the tyres and motor.

SIMON O’CONNOR/Stuff

Mitch built everything for the bike, except the tyres and motor.

He drew his original plans on a small piece of paper, before drawing it in full size on a piece of cardboard on the ground.

“It’s been a project for a year-and-a-half,” Pearce said. “Everything I designed worked out, which is surprising.”

There’s a few problems – like his shirt getting stuck in the wheel, the seat being a little uncomfortable, and the fact he uses his foot to slow more than his brake, but he’s happy.

Other than the gifted motor and wheels, which he got off a mountain bike he bought for $200, he made everything else himself.

Pearce said the bike cost him just $600 ($400 of that on paint) – a little more than the annual cost of registering one of his petrol-powered bikes.

SIMON O’CONNOR/Stuff

Pearce said the bike cost him just $600 ($400 of that on paint) – a little more than the annual cost of registering one of his petrol-powered bikes.

The project came at a cost of $600 – $400 of which was on paint.

He took it to Electricarna, a show for electric vehicle enthusiasts, at the weekend, and got a lot of positive feedback.

“I’m stoked with how it turned out, it’s exactly how I thought it would be.”

Pearce finished the e-bike just after Christmas and has been cruising along New Plymouth’s Coastal Walkway ever since.

When Pearce is driving he low-rider bike in his black sunglasses and helmet it may appear as though he’s going to cause trouble on the walkway, but he doesn’t.

“I go just a little bit over walking speed.

“It only goes cruising speed.”



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SHOPPING CART

close