Van knocks e-scooter rider off his bike as he drives it along a main road in the dark  Leave a comment


Shocking moment van knocks e-scooter rider off his bike as he drives it along a main road in the dark

  • Mark Dibley witnessed the incident on the A33 near Chineham, Hampshire
  • White van collides with the e-scooter and sends rider plummeting to the ground
  • Rider complained his arm hurt and his jacket was ripped but otherwise was fine

Dashcam footage captured the heart-stopping moment a van knocked an e-scooter rider to the ground as he drove along a main road at night.

Mark Dibley witnessed the incident while driving along the A33 near Chineham, Hampshire, in the dark.

The white van can be seen colliding with the electric scooter before the rider is sent plummeting to the ground.

In the clip, recorded on February 4, rain can be seen falling on to the windscreen as a procession of traffic makes its way down the carriageway – which is not illuminated by street lights. 

The white van up ahead appears to suddenly clip the e-scooter as it travels along the verge and the male rider falls to the ground. 

The van continues on its journey but Mark pulls in to check on the scooter user who has clambered to his feet to get out of the way of oncoming cars. 

He clutches his elbow and looks around in disbelief with his e-scooter, which appears to have a headlight on it, lying on the grass verge. 

Dashcam footage captured the heart-stopping moment a van knocked an e-scooter rider to the ground as he drove along the A33 near Chineham, Hampshire, at night

Mark said that the rider complained that his arm hurt and his jacket was ripped but otherwise was fine.

He added: ‘Eventually the van did come back to check on the scooter rider.’ 

Privately owned e-scooters are banned from pavements, roads and cycle paths under the 1835 Highway Act, but can be used on private land with the landowner’s permission.

Riding rental e-scooters on the road and on cycle paths became legal in the UK on July 4 last year, but the machines have a top speed of 15.5mph

The stunned rider continues to clutch his arm and looks around in disbelief with his e-scooter, which appears to have a headlight on it, lying on the grass verge

The stunned rider continues to clutch his arm and looks around in disbelief with his e-scooter, which appears to have a headlight on it, lying on the grass verge

You must have a driving licence or a provisional driving licence and be at least 16 years old to hire an electric scooter.

The Government is currently conducting a trial of e-scooter rental fleets in cities across the country with a view to legalisation.

Milton Keynes and Birmingham have successfully launched the scheme and last year York City Council announced it was working with Tier Mobility to deploy 50 e-scooters in the city.

However in Coventry the scheme was axed after just five days when riders flouted rules by mounting pavements. 

What is the law on riding electric scooters in the UK?

E-scooters are classified as Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), which means they are subject to all the same legal requirements including MOT, tax and licensing.

According to the Department of Transport, it is illegal to ride privately-owned electric scooters on the pavement, roads and cycle paths.

You can only ride your own e-scooter on private land, with permission from the person who owns the land. 

Privately-owned e-scooters cannot be legally ridden on the roads because they don’t always have visible rear red lights, number plates or signal ability 

Riding rental e-scooters on the roads and cycle paths became legal in the UK on July 4 last year but they are still illegal to ride on the motorway.    

Riding these scooters on pavements will also remain illegal and will only be allowed in pre-approved locations where the hiring scheme is taking place.    

You must have a driving licence or a provisional driving licence and be at least 16 years old to hire an electric scooter.

They will be limited to a maximum speed of 15.5mph.

The Government is currently conducting a trial of electric, or e-scooter, rental fleets in cities across the country with a view to legalisation.

Milton Keynes and Birmingham have successfully launched the scheme and last year York City Council announced it was working with Tier Mobility to deploy 50 e-scooters in the city.

In Coventry the scheme was axed after just five days when riders flouted rules by mounting pavements.

Another pilot in Hartlepool was scrapped before it even got started. 

Up to 36 towns and cities have signed up to the Department for Transport’s 12-month scheme, which makes it legal to ride e-scooters on roads – however, they need to be rented and need to be capped at 15.5mph. 



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